developing characters · Writing Craft Wednesday

WCW: Developing Well-Rounded Characters – Positive and Negative Traits

books-1141910_640

What draws you into a book? Is it the thrilling plot? The sizzling romance?  The comical situations?

 

Or is it something more?

 

I am willing to bet that the reason you love your favorite book is not because of the plot but because of the characters that move through the plot.

 

As a writer, it is absolutely crucial to create characters that are well-rounded and real. So just exactly how is this done?

 

Creating Real People

 

carolinemyssA couple weeks ago I discussed the idea of using archetypes to develop a general idea of your character’s profile. While the universal elements of archetype may draw a reader initially to a character, there must be something more than just kiddie pool depth for your characters to become favorites. They must be real.

 

Real people have good qualities and bad qualities, or flaws as they are often referred to in the writing world. We see these traits in people through their actions. You don’t hear people going around announcing “I’m cynical” or “I’m adaptable” to the world (usually), and even if they did, you wouldn’t believe them until you saw it through their actions.

 

I can say I’m a morning person all I want, but until you see me actually clock-63741_640willingly getting my butt out of bed before 9 AM and happy about it, you might doubt it. By the way, if you haven’t guessed, mornings and I are not on speaking terms.

 

Thus, as a writer, it is critical to determine the personality traits of your characters, both good and bad, and determine ways to show this subtly through their actions.

 

Positive and Negative Traits

 

If you are like me, at the beginning, I struggled with deciding what are personality traits and the behaviors that go with my characters.  Enter one of my favorite writing resources, Angela Ackerman’s and Becca Puglist’s Positive and Negative Trait Thesaurusus (or thesauri, depending on your grammar philosophy).

 

 

 

Each thesaurus includes a definition, category (they have a whole intro section on this), similar attributes, possible causes, associated behaviors, associated thoughts, associated emotions, positive aspects, negative aspects, examples in literature and film, traits in supporting characters that may cause conflict, challenging scenarios, and even how a negative trait can become overcome.

 

Whenever I create my hero, heroine, and even my “villain”, I am sure to pick out 3 – 4 positive and negative traits each to help define my character. Sometimes the traits are a major part of their character, and sometimes the traits are just one of those little quirks that people have.

Determining How a Character Behaves

 

After I have listed out their traits, I also list out the associated behaviors I can see my character doing. Sometimes I begin to see a pattern of behaviors that are repeated across traits and I realize these behaviors need to be something highly visual in my storyline. For quick reference sake, I “distill” my characters down to a few, easy to reference traits and behaviors to post onto my bulletin board.

 

Here is my heroine’s “distilled” list:

Values: Security, Loyalty, Honesty

  • Holds on to goals long after prudentoffice-1454087_640
  • Unparalleled sense of morality
  • fight for what is right no matter what
  • Ferocious Loyalty
  • Not letting others help
  • Determined
  • Refusing to admit defeat
  • Acting without thinking of the consequences (courageous, impulsive)
  • Spontaneous
  • Acting in response to emotions (this and the next behavior cause inner conflict at times)
  • Firm control of emotions
  • Light manipulation to keep attention away from self
  • Honest
  • Thinks in metaphors
  • Growing quiet, lost in thought
  • Adventurous
  • Creative problem solving

 

It might still need a little fine tuning, but I use it as a general list as I work through my story.

 

 

What about you? How do you determine what traits your character has? What traits do you admire in heroes or heroines?

You’ve learned part of my process above, but the traits I love most in my hero and heroines are quick wit, loyal, independent, and strong senses of justice. This is perhaps why most of the stories in my head center around some of those themes.

 

Come back in a couple weeks when I talk about Creating Well-Rounded Characters – Giving Them Life on 3/15/17.

 

Previous Post: Creating Well-Rounded Characters – Archetypes

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s